studio pop-in with yoshie burns

Please tell how you came to specialise in Saori weaving.  I first became interested in Saori weaving by accident.  I was having a day out looking in craft shops in Osaka in 2006 and one of the shops had a Saori loom set up where you could try it for fun. It looked interesting so I sat down and had a go. It was so fun and simple I fell in love with it immediately. I felt as though Saori found me. After that first try I found Suyoko-san who runs a studio called Suyo in Tamatsukuri, Osaka. There I learnt how to use the loom, make the warp and a variety of techniques that got me started. The philosophy behind Saori weaving is in my mind the freedom to express yourself through experimenting with colour and yarn. Saori feels very natural and acts like nature where things take on their own forms and patterns. I also like the way you can follow set patterns and produce work that is more uniform. I like mixing various styles together to see what I can create. Where do you hope to take your practice in the future? I would like to run workshops with all ages to help them tap into their creative side and feel the joy of weaving. I think Saori’s simplicity is a great way to bring this out. I would also like to show it's therapeutic and meditative qualities in the way it acts on the senses when using the loom through colour, movement and sound. I am also happy to share techniques with people who are wanting to further their weaving skills into other areas. Your woven garments are extraordinary, the patterns are simple but yet so stylish. What/who are your fashion inspirations? Weaving is so ancient you can travel through time exploring all of the colours, textures and patterns from around the world. I love the way nature influences the traditional costumes in each culture. Lately I have been looking at Australian birds, flowers and scenery thinking of ways I can incorporate them into my weaving. Being Japanese I definitely draw inspiration from the simple shapes and lines found in both modern and traditional Japanese clothing. I also like experimenting with patterns and find that often by making mistakes I come up with new ideas.  Is your husband Cailan Burns aka, Too Much To Dream, also your muse? Tell us about Mystery Twin. Cailan is one of my influences he always paints with bright colours and has unique ideas. It would be fun to try and collaborate with him creating something using weaving and painting. I could imagine one of his creatures coming to life with a mixture of sculpture, painting and weaving. One for the future to do list. In regards to Mystery Twin. This was a musical project Cailan worked on over many years between Osaka and Melbourne and finally with the help of friends finished in 2010. I sang in Japanese on two tracks which was fun. His style is very ambient and dreamlike, I love listening to it when I am weaving. It also has a beautifully illustrated cover and a poster inside which Cailan designed. You might be able to still get it here at Sensory Projects. Yoshie will be assisting us as a  guest cook for the Feast on the 27th Of March. We are also thrilled to announce that we will be exhibiting a small collection of her Saori garments in our studio on Saturday 28th and Sunday 29th of March from 1:30-4:30 pm. She will be demonstrating some of her techniques during the Sunday session and exclusively for the guests on the night of the Feast. Please come and admire and enquire about this very special form of weaving at Pop Craft Studio, 1/177 Beavers Road, Northcote 3070. All photos courtesy of Heartland

Please tell how you came to specialise in Saori weaving. 
I first became interested in Saori weaving by accident.  I was having a day out looking in craft shops in Osaka in 2006 and one of the shops had a Saori loom set up where you could try it for fun. It looked interesting so I sat down and had a go. It was so fun and simple I fell in love with it immediately. I felt as though Saori found me. After that first try I found Suyoko-san who runs a studio called Suyo in Tamatsukuri, Osaka. There I learnt how to use the loom, make the warp and a variety of techniques that got me started. The philosophy behind Saori weaving is in my mind the freedom to express yourself through experimenting with colour and yarn. Saori feels very natural and acts like nature where things take on their own forms and patterns. I also like the way you can follow set patterns and produce work that is more uniform. I like mixing various styles together to see what I can create.

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?
I would like to run workshops with all ages to help them tap into their creative side and feel the joy of weaving. I think Saori’s simplicity is a great way to bring this out. I would also like to show it's therapeutic and meditative qualities in the way it acts on the senses when using the loom through colour, movement and sound. I am also happy to share techniques with people who are wanting to further their weaving skills into other areas.

Your woven garments are extraordinary, the patterns are simple but yet so stylish. What/who are your fashion inspirations?
Weaving is so ancient you can travel through time exploring all of the colours, textures and patterns from around the world. I love the way nature influences the traditional costumes in each culture. Lately I have been looking at Australian birds, flowers and scenery thinking of ways I can incorporate them into my weaving. Being Japanese I definitely draw inspiration from the simple shapes and lines found in both modern and traditional Japanese clothing. I also like experimenting with patterns and find that often by making mistakes I come up with new ideas. 

Is your husband Cailan Burns aka, Too Much To Dream, also your muse? Tell us about Mystery Twin.
Cailan is one of my influences he always paints with bright colours and has unique ideas. It would be fun to try and collaborate with him creating something using weaving and painting. I could imagine one of his creatures coming to life with a mixture of sculpture, painting and weaving. One for the future to do list. In regards to Mystery Twin. This was a musical project Cailan worked on over many years between Osaka and Melbourne and finally with the help of friends finished in 2010. I sang in Japanese on two tracks which was fun. His style is very ambient and dreamlike, I love listening to it when I am weaving. It also has a beautifully illustrated cover and a poster inside which Cailan designed. You might be able to still get it here at Sensory Projects.

Yoshie will be assisting us as a  guest cook for the Feast on the 27th Of March. We are also thrilled to announce that we will be exhibiting a small collection of her Saori garments in our studio on Saturday 28th and Sunday 29th of March from 1:30-4:30 pm. She will be demonstrating some of her techniques during the Sunday session and exclusively for the guests on the night of the Feast. Please come and admire and enquire about this very special form of weaving at Pop Craft Studio, 1/177 Beavers Road, Northcote 3070.

All photos courtesy of Heartland